.

OP-ED from California PTA President: Pop Quiz on Prop. 38 - One More Time

California PTA president provides information about Proposition 38.

If you are like most Californians, you know our schools are in trouble.

And you care deeply about YOUR local school.

But you have not had enough time to study the initiatives.

Here is a chance to learn more about Proposition 38 - so that when you enter the voting booth, it does not feel like that dreaded pop quiz.

The California State PTA helped write and is supporting Proposition 38 to restore the programs and services that have been cut at all our local schools.

Ready?

Let's start. (Don't miss the question for extra points at the end!)

Here is the title of Proposition 38

TAX TO FUND EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Read the following quotes in italics from the Independent Legislative Analyst and then see if you can answer the quiz.

"Fiscal Effect

Around $10 Billion of Additional Annual State Revenues. In the initial years—beginning in 2013–14—the annual amount of additional state revenues raised would be around $10 billion. …The total revenues generated would tend to grow over time.

Distributes School Funds Through Three Grant Programs.

Proposition 38 requires that CETF school funds be allocated as follows:

Educational Program Grants (70 Percent of Funds). The largest share of funds—70 percent of all CETF school funding—would be distributed based on the number of students at each school. …Educational program grants could be spent on a broad range of activities, including instruction, school support staff (such as counselors and librarians), and parent engagement.

Low-Income Student Grants (18 Percent of Funds). The measure requires that 18 percent of CETF school funds be allocated at one statewide rate based on the number of low-income students (defined as the number of students eligible for free school meals) enrolled in each school. As with the educational program grants, low-income student grants could be spent on a broad range of educational activities. 

Training, Technology, and Teaching Materials Grants (12 Percent of Funds). The remaining 12 percent of funds would be allocated at one statewide rate based on the number of students at each school. The funds could be used only for training school staff and purchasing up-to-date technology and teaching materials.

Quiz

  1. Does Proposition 38 raise about $ 10 billion per year?
  2. Does Proposition 38 require the funds to be spent at each school based on the number of students?
  3. Does Proposition 38 provide extra funding for low-income students at their school?
  4. Does Proposition 38 help teachers with training, technology and teaching materials?

Answer:

Yes to all questions

QUESTION FOR EXTRA POINTS

How much money will your local school receive?

Click here to find out:  www.prop38forlocalschools.org/restore.

Now that you've taken the quiz, check back again to learn more about Prop 38.

Carol Kocivar is the president of the California Parent Teacher Association.

Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 01:53 AM
Prioritize government spending. Reduce after inflation government spending to 2000 levels, and you will have plenty of money. Cancel the high speed rail boondoggle, and you have ~$3 billion of the $6 billion the Brown tax increase claims it will raise. [Of course the real number will be less because taxpayers will move themselves or their money out of CA.] (http://californiabudgetbites.org/2011/01/ cited above, says not increasing taxes will require cutting $930 per student out of >$11,000 per student. That is 8.45%. Not the end of the world. Families and businesses base their spending on the money available and prioritize accordingly. Brown and the Dems passed a budget that cuts education spending if the voters to not pass the tax increase. They can make other choices. The above history of education spending shows little or no correlation between more spending on government run education and results. Real per student spending has more than doubled since 1970 and what has happened to the quality of government run education?
Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 01:53 AM
Prioritize government spending. Reduce after inflation government spending to 2000 levels, and you will have plenty of money. Cancel the high speed rail boondoggle, and you have ~$3 billion of the $6 billion the Brown tax increase claims it will raise. [Of course the real number will be less because taxpayers will move themselves or their money out of CA.] (http://californiabudgetbites.org/2011/01/ cited above, says not increasing taxes will require cutting $930 per student out of >$11,000 per student. That is 8.45%. Not the end of the world. Families and businesses base their spending on the money available and prioritize accordingly. Brown and the Dems passed a budget that cuts education spending if the voters to not pass the tax increase. They can make other choices. The above history of education spending shows little or no correlation between more spending on government run education and results. Real per student spending has more than doubled since 1970 and what has happened to the quality of government run education?
Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 01:57 AM
Government run education is no less indoctrinating. I favor letting parents choose the school they want for their children.
Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 01:59 AM
Please see Fran Tarkenton, What if the NFL Played by Teachers' Rules? http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204226204576601232986845102.html
Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 02:02 AM
Instead of education, how about cutting benefits for illegal immigrants? How about reducing welfare. CA has 12% of the population in America and 33% of the welfare cases. CA spends ~3X per inmate as TX. Why? Government is never expected to be efficient or effective. Government employees get paid the same regardless of what they individually or their agencies, departments or districts accomplish. In the private sector, we have to produce good or services that other people will voluntarily purchase.
Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 09:30 AM
I believe that if either tax increase passes, it will make CA’s budget deficit and education funding worse. Added to CA’s anti business polices, the tax increase will drive more successful people and businesses out of CA. The wealthy are most able to move themselves or their money out of CA, e.g. make the second home in Incline Village, NV their primary residence. Leaving tax increases aside, if you are so worried about more money for schools, why don’t you work on improving CA’s terrible business climate to attract more business and jobs and hence tax revenue? One telling statistic, "From 2007 through 2010, 10,763 industrial facilities were built or expanded across the country — but only 176 of those were in CA. So with roughly 12% of the nation’s population, CA got 1.6% of the built or expanded industrial facilities." http://www.foxandhoundsdaily.com/2012/09/breaking-bad-california-vs-the-other-states/ CA has to compete with other states and counties for investment and jobs. CA should be the #1 place to start or expand a business. If CA had a business climate to match its natural (weather) climate, [if Romney and the Reps win the national election, that would be a big help b/c 1.3% national growth limits what any state can do] you would see an explosion of growth, jobs and tax revenue to CA government. Chasing tax revenue with higher tax rates is a futile losing exercise.
Karen Hohman Almeida October 24, 2012 at 07:43 PM
All the rhetoric in the world will not save our schools or our children today. We are two weeks from an election that could provide us with some immediate relief from this horrible educational crisis. It's time to stop talking and take action. Unless someone has a better solution for fixing this in the next two weeks, I suggest that anyone who cares at all about the future of our children consider these propositions. Then we can all feel free to go back and talk. Or maybe even come up with some better solutions. We are a stone's throw away from the state taking over our schools....a state that can't balance a budget. What happens then?
Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 09:38 PM
If the Dems and GEUs get their tax increase, there will be no reforms or options, until they run out of other people's money again and come back to the taxpayers for more.
Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 09:52 PM
Prioritize government spending and make government effective and efficient before asking the taxpayers for more money. (part 1) Reduce after inflation government spending to 2000 levels, and you will have plenty of money. “Adjusted for inflation, California’s government spending increased 42 percent per capita from 2000 to 2010.” http://www.foxandhoundsdaily.com/2012/10/reason-rupe-poll-california-voters-moving-towards-wisconsin-like-government-reforms/ Cancel the high speed rail boondoggle, and you have ~$3 billion of the $6 billion the Brown tax increase claims it will raise. [Of course, the actual amount the tax increase will raise will be less because taxpayers will move themselves or their money out of CA and/or otherwise change their behavior to reduce their tax burden.] (http://californiabudgetbites.org/2011/01/ says not increasing taxes will require cutting $930 per student [out of $11,405 per student. http://www.lao.ca.gov/reports/2011/calfacts/calfacts_010511.aspx (p.13)]. That is 8.15%. Not the end of the world. Families and businesses base their spending on the money available and prioritize accordingly. How many families and businesses have and to reduce their spending by 8% or more?
Gregory Brittain October 24, 2012 at 09:54 PM
Prioritize government spending and make government effective and efficient before asking the taxpayers for more money. (part 2) Brown and the Dems passed a budget that cuts education spending if the voters to not pass the tax increase. They can make other choices. The Dems could probably find other budget reductions if they wanted to such as HSR and CA's welfare program that has 33% of the nation's welfare recipients with 12% of the nation’s population. Or perhaps state employee compensation that increased three times as fast as the per capita personal income of all Californians. http://www.foxandhoundsdaily.com/2012/10/alarming-compensation-trends-for-state-workers/ Or cut benefits for illegal immigrants. Or deal with why it costs ~3X more per inmate in CA than TX. Government is never expected to be efficient or effective. The above history of education spending shows little or no correlation between more spending on government run education and results. Real per student spending in America has more than doubled since 1970 and what has happened to the quality of government run education? Don’t fall for the Dems’ and GEUs’ trick, “pass our tax increase or we’ll cut the programs you care more about.” Vote for Jobs http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=LRSbH73-oqM
Amanda Frye October 24, 2012 at 11:14 PM
Education must be a priority. I agree there is mismanagement in education and bloated administration issues that must be dealt with in education. However, I am extremely concerned about Redlands schools. In order to attract businesses and productive citizens to our community, top notch schools that can compete at a national level are a must. I believe Mr. Brittain has a role in the local Chamber of Commerce so he should agree with the need to attract business and productive citizens to the community. Outstanding high schools are the key to successful communities. Recent studies have stated that outstanding schools are the key to success in Inland Empire communities. Without ballot measure funding Redlands Schools will be in major financial trouble and possibly their bonds as well. Do we want to see Redlands sink and become another San Bernardino? Who wants to move to Redlands given the state the city and schools that will be in major financial trouble?
Angela Vazquez October 25, 2012 at 12:36 AM
As a product of both Fontana Unified and Redlands Unified (with parents who are teachers in both districts!) and as a transplanted Angeleno and education advocate, I think I have a unique perspective on California's public education finance system. Going to elementary school in Fontana then moving to Redlands was a huge change in terms of the quality of programs, facilities, materials, and even teaching. At a young age I saw the disparities between low-income schools right next door to more well-off communities. I graduated from RHS and have gone on to do education advocacy in LA. To hear my parents talk about the cuts on top of cuts makes me angry. To hear that Redlands is facing furlough days and increasing class sizes is appalling. It is clear that no school in California is safe. We have sustained decades of consistent under-funding our public education system in this state, but we have reached a tipping point, and Californians are fed up. No student is getting the high-quality, first-class education that they deserve. Our state cannot keep robbing schools and expect to have a workforce that can compete on a global scale. Prop 38 is the ONLY initiative on the ballot that adds ADDITIONAL money to California's schools and does not entrench the inequities and budget shenanigans that have been standard operating procedure in Sacramento. YES ON 38.
Amanda Frye October 25, 2012 at 12:51 AM
Cheering mediocrity and comparing RHS to some low end school is the typical fall back position from the average person in Redlands. RUSD probably misled voters about the need for another high school which added more expenses including more administration. Since property values have declined my guess is the school bonds have some issues. I'm not from California, but two children graduated from RHS and I'm very concerned about my other two children's education options. The only reason we are in Redlands is because of ESRI. Things have deteriorated since we moved to Redlands 18 years ago. Even in 1997 when my son enrolled in kindergarten, RUSD was crying the blues about "no money" yet I witnessed blatant waste. I am constantly writing checks for things yet there is little to no accountability. One month RUSD demanded $1000 between my four children. Starting school in the peak of summer racking up air conditioning bills is wasteful The problem is that the citizens in Redlands do not value children or quality education and don't understand their competition is not San Bernardino. RHS could be an outstanding school but everyone wants to be a cheerleader for mediocrity. There is little creativity in our leadership. I'm not sure if Yes on 38 is the answer or not.
Angela Vazquez October 25, 2012 at 04:43 PM
My comments were not at all about cheering mediocrity. It was about saying that we've seen decades of disinvestment in schools (which, coincidentally, aligns with the increase in Latino students in California, of which I am one). Higher income neighborhoods have managed to keep their local schools afloat (e.g. Redlands) with local property taxes and middle-income families forking over cash on demand from their local schools. We've reached a point where now even schools like RHS are not immune from the slashing and burning of school finance to pay for things like prison realignment. This is unacceptable.
Amanda Frye October 25, 2012 at 05:41 PM
The problem in Redlands is mindset and lack of accountability among the leadership including school board who misled voters about the need for a third high school which has done nothing but hurt students in the district. RUSD dismissed help from local GIS experts and geographers that told a different story. Redlands leadership is driving out the wealth and upper class in exchange for low end people who don't ask questions. Look at who is in charge of the city and look around at what they have invited into town. RUSD hates it when parents demand better and ask questions so they like the people that don't ask questions. Redlands has turned into nothing but a circus with the clowns running the circus. The problems in RUSD and Redlands are rooted in the wrong mindset and the wrong people in charge.
J C English October 29, 2012 at 07:50 PM
What is the matter with you? No more taxes and government. What do you propose instead? It is easy to complain not so easy to provide answers. We have seen a continous cut to educational funding and a prarallel downward trend in test scores. No more government what does that mean? no more police? no more trash pick up no more cleanup of polluted beaches? Goverment is an institution that is run by people just like us and they tend to have a one size fits all mentality but in a democracy we the people get to have input in the process. We often just ignore what government is doing until it is a crisis then all of sudden everyone gets on the bandwagon with their platitudes. California ranks at the bottom in per pupil spending. We need to fix that. We need to teach kids how to read and write and think before they can get jobs. You remind me of the guy who's car broke down in the desert and refuses to spend a couple hundred dollars on repairs because he has determined he has spent too much on the car already. Of course that leaves him stranded in the middle of nowhere with a car that doesnt work but he would rather die in the desert than spend a few hundred to get home.
J C English October 29, 2012 at 08:01 PM
It costs more than 11,000 to send a kid to a good private school and if I am not mistaken those good private schools have waiting lists. What if your 11,000 doesn't get your kid in what then? This country revoltionized education by offering free to all. We have been underming it because we are selfish we want to keep all our money for ourselves instead of investing it in the future. Our grandparents knew the value of a good education and appreciated that it was free. so much so they would walk 9 miles barefoot in the snow to go to school. Good schools make good citizens and good citizens make good government. Those who would cut education know this and simply would rather have an uninformed electorate that can be sold any bill of goods that serves the corporate interest.
J C English October 29, 2012 at 08:06 PM
And your point is? Statistics are meaningless unless there is a context you do not provide the context cherry picking is dangerous as you need to remember that is how we ended up in Iraq which was a Republican driven war that costs billions for a problem that actually wasn't a problem and now we have to pay for it.
Angela Vazquez October 29, 2012 at 08:06 PM
Driving out the upper class in exchange for low end people." I can't help but hear some "47%" subtext in there. But, I have to say, even the children of the "47%" deserve a first-class education. YES ON 38
Diego Jones October 29, 2012 at 09:03 PM
Throwing good money after bad will not fix the system. According to the RUSD 2011 school reports, $5000-$6000 is given to every student, and $13,000-$15,000 for each special education kid at Orangewood. Local measures, grants, and additional funding brings to total up. That's $160,000 to $320,000 per classroom. The schools have lost money like every other industry ($8400 per kid to $6000), so instead of cutting back or becoming efficient, they cry for money to be taken out of the economy. I want a good school for my kids, not a bloated one.
J C English October 29, 2012 at 09:21 PM
"Government run" education is a misnomer. The money comes from a budget collected in taxes by the government however local school boards, elected members of the community in which they serve, are the people who have the say in how the schools are run. Furthermore you like statistics so much how about this: CA school districts with a higher per capita income (read higher tax rates) show a much higher level in testing than the rest of the state. Interestingly these schools tend to have smaller class sizes and more up to date materials, fewer layoffs of school personnel, and enough textbooks to go around. Schools with lower tax bases (lower income neighborhoods) don't have the money hence high class sizes not enough materials and lower than average test scores. Do the math.
J C English October 29, 2012 at 09:29 PM
The private sector does better than the public? Is that why I wait on hold for 30 minutes to talk to customer service reps, and even then get no where? I have to pump my own gas and check out my own groceries at the store. Try shopping at a Home Depot, good luck finding someone who will actually wait on you without you scouring the aisles for someone in an orange vest or even knows how to answer your questions. We are suppose to have a service economy OK if so where is the service? Private sector? mmmm not so good.
J C English October 29, 2012 at 11:37 PM
Yeah right on! Let's cut welfare let the innocent children starve, let them sleep in the cold, let them eat cake if there is no bread sure why not? Who cares about them anyway? Oh I bet you are a right to life advocate too. Fine does that mean you don't have to care what happens to babies after they are born?
Gregory Brittain October 29, 2012 at 11:47 PM
Be careful Ms. Frye. By asking for fiscal responsibility from government and that government use our money effectively and efficiently, you might be mistaken for a member of the "extreme" "Nazi like" Tea Party. If you don't want "low end people who don't ask questions," you sound like the Dems' caricature of Mitt Romney and Reps in general. But you may be on to something about Dems. Bob Hope on Dems http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkmS6JrWSPU&feature=related
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 02:21 AM
Another good article. All Californians Should Reject Prop. 30 http://www.foxandhoundsdaily.com/2012/10/all-californians-should-reject-prop-30/ “Prop 30 makes bad matters worse for already overtaxed Californians.” “Prop 30 gives politicians the authority to continue to spend our tax dollars however they want.” “Prop 30 does not guarantee that our schools and kids will get the help they need.” “Prop 30 does not include one shred of reform – only more taxes to feed Sacramento’s spending addiction and frenzy.” “Prop 30 actually harms small businesses – California’s job creators – while exempting Big Corporations.” BTW, www.foxandhoundsdaily.com is very good source on CA politics.
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 02:24 AM
Good rule of thumb, if the politicians in Sacramento have ~$3 Billion to squander on HSR, they do not need or deserve more of our money. HSR represents ~ 1/2 of the money they say Prop 30 will raise. The HSR train from nowhere to nowhere is the easiest budget savings ever.
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 06:01 AM
Inflation adjusted education spending has ~quadrupled since 1960 and more than doubled since 1970. And what happened to the quality of government run education over that time?
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 06:03 AM
Please see Fran Tarkenton, What if the NFL Played by Teachers' Rules? http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204226204576601232986845102.html If every football player was paid based on seniority and could not be cut from the team absent very serious misconduct, what would happen to the quality of the game? More generally, government employees keep their jobs and get raises regardless of how hard they work and what they individually or their agencies, departments, schools or districts accomplish. It is practically impossible to fire a government employee for doing a lousy job, never mind merely mediocre. In the private sector, we have to produce goods or services that other people will voluntarily purchase. At least with education, there is a perverse incentive. When the government schools do a lousy job, the Dems, education system and GEUs can say our kids need a good education so the government needs to spend more money on the (lousy) government schools. Without accusing them of trying to provide lousy education, people and systems respond to financial incentives. There is certainly no financial incentive for any teacher or employee of the government schools, or for the government run school system to do a good job.
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 06:16 AM
Let’s imagine that in order to assure everyone gets food, the government will collect taxes and provide free food to everyone. However, to get your free government provided food, you must go to the government grocery store nearest to where you live. We will unionize the employees of the government food industry. After three years, the employees get tenure and absent serious misconduct, it is practically impossible to fire any employee of the government food system. Furthermore, all employees of the government food system will be paid based on sonority regardless of how hard they work or what they accomplish. In addition, the unions of employees of the government food system will take money involuntarily from all employees of the government food system to use to help elect politicians friendly to the government food system unions, which politicians will give raises and unaffordable pension benefits to the employee of the government food system. The employees of the government food system will all get raise each year regardless of the quality of food and service provided by the government food system. I have a tough question for all Dems, Libs and GEU members, What would happen to the quality and cost of the food and service in the government food system compared to the current system of food provided by private businesses? Anyone who questioned this system, would be accused being against people and especially children having food.
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 08:54 PM
“Adjusted for inflation, California’s government spending increased 42 percent per capita from 2000 to 2010.” http://www.foxandhoundsdaily.com/2012/10/reason-rupe-poll-california-voters-moving-towards-wisconsin-like-government-reforms/ Reduce per capita inflation adjusted spending to 2000 levels and there will be plenty of money. There would probably be enough to return money to the taxpayers.

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »